Foundation Repair FAQ

Many of our Peak customer’s have had similar questions when it comes to our Foundation Repair solutions. Please see if any of the below questions pertain to you. If not, one of our team members would be more than happy to address your questions, comments or concerns. Please use the live chat or contact us!

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Foundation Repair FAQ

Many of our customers call us for an inspection after noticing cracks in drywall, stucco, or brick, sloping or soft spots in floors, or doors and windows that stick or seem to be out of alignment. If you see these warning signs, call for an expert evaluation by a certified foundation repair specialist before the issue gets worse!
Yes, you can. Some have done so, however, and lived to regret it. These issues do not get better with time and they never fix themselves. Postponing or procrastinating on permanently stabilizing your foundation can not only result in the structural damage getting worse and costlier to repair, but may also result in greater cosmetic damage happening in your home to hard surfaces like tile, stone, brick, stucco, or sheetrock which have a low tolerance for structural movement.
Foundation settlement damage occurs when the soils the home rests on becomes unstable. The presence or absence of water under the foundation can cause certain clay minerals to shrink, expand, or become “plastic” in a way that fails to support the load of the structure above.
Managing water in the soils adjacent your foundation is always a good idea, and is almost universally recommended by engineers, architects, and builders. However, if foundation damage has already occurred, taking these steps now will do nothing to reverse that damage.
Depending on the scope of the project, some landscaping may need to be removed to execute the repair. At the time of your estimate, Peak Structural’s Design Specialist will review with you everything you need to know on what to expect during your project’s installation. There are steps you can take to help protect your foundation when it comes to landscaping. Read more here.
No, we do not provide this service.
We get this question a lot! It’s a bit like asking- how much does a car cost? Due to the tremendously variable conditions unique to every home or property, however, there simply is no one-size-fits-most answer. Therefore, Peak Structural provides property owners in our community with free, individualized property specific inspections and estimates.
It never hurts to ask! However, in our experience, it’s unlikely that foundation repair is covered by your homeowner’s policy, because most insurance companies have excluded coverage for damages resulting from “ground movement”. Nevertheless, we have seen a few exceptions to this over the years, so talk to your agent!
Yes, light duty helical piers are a great solution for permanently stabilizing decks and we provide this solution to customers throughout our service territory.
Yes….but, you may regret it. Since everything in your home rests directly or indirectly on your home’s foundation, including the expensive fixtures and finishes found in newly remodeled kitchens and bathrooms, any repairs done or adjustments made to your foundation later can introduce stresses and damage to those beautiful, newly remodeled spaces you’ve just created. You’d probably think twice about having your car repainted if you learned it had frame damage, right? Remodeling before foundation work is no different.
For some folks who are handy with tools, it might be tempting to consider do-it-yourself foundation repair. However, have you ever noticed or wondered why there is no Foundation Repair aisle at the big box home improvement stores? It’s because the specially engineered products used for this type of work require specialized equipment and training not available to most tradespeople or general contractors, let alone the general public, leaving the DIY’er with really only a couple of band-aid level options. Read here why foundation repairs should be left to experts that are specially trained and certified in this type of work.
Colorado’s most significant geologic hazard is swelling soil — that is, soil laced with layers of certain types of clays. These clays cause more property damage than any other natural hazard. Bentonite and montmorillonite (weathered volcanic ash) clays underlie many populated areas of Colorado. They can expand up to 15% by volume when exposed to water and may exert up to 20,000 pounds of force per square foot, more than enough force to break or push around any manmade structure they encounter. Colorado Geological Survey wrote a booklet about this hazard for homeowners; you can view it here.
Inward bowing damage occurs when the lateral (horizontal) pressures of the soil against the foundation walls exceed the wall’s ability to withstand it. We see this type of damage most commonly when exterior landscape grading conditions are flat or even negative, so that surface water cannot run away from the foundation walls efficiently. Saturation of the soils adjacent to the foundation walls results, which increases the pushing force of the soils against the foundation walls. This condition is made worse when combined with rain gutters or downspouts that are missing or not functioning correctly.